Review: Wolf Hollow (Lauren Wolk)

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Genre: Middle Grade, Historical Fiction
Publisher: Dutton Books
Publication date: May 3, 2016
Format: Hardcover
Source: Personal
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Blurb:

Growing up in the shadows cast by two world wars, Annabelle has lived a mostly quiet, steady life in her small Pennsylvania town. Until the day new student Betty Glengarry walks into her class. Betty quickly reveals herself to be cruel and manipulative, and while her bullying seems isolated at first, things quickly escalate, and reclusive World War I veteran Toby becomes a target of her attacks. While others have always seen Toby’s strangeness, Annabelle knows only kindness. She will soon need to find the courage to stand as a lone voice of justice as tensions mount.

Brilliantly crafted, Wolf Hollow is a haunting tale of America at a crossroads and a time when one girl’s resilience, strength, and compassion help to illuminate the darkest corners of our history.

Review:

“The year I turned twelve, I learned that what I said and what I did mattered. So much, sometimes, that I wasn’t sure I wanted such a burden. But I took it anyway, and I carried it as best I could.”  

Wolf Hollow is a middle grade historical fiction based in Pennsylvania, US during the second world war and focuses on the devastating impact of bullying, neglected childhood, and the importance of bravery to stand up for those unable to do so for themselves.

I fell in love with the cover of Wolf Hollow in an instant. This story had the perfect mix of 1940’s America caught between one of the most brutal wars of our time and the simple farm life that became the setting of this story.

It tells the tale of Annabelle, an 11-year old girl who comes into contact with a mean and evil-spirited girl, Betty, set on ruling her school and her life. This story gave us a complicated insight to fighting prejudice, facing conflict in the best way possible and having courage to help others when all hope seems lost.

Annabelle developed a beautiful friendship with Toby, the war veteran that eventually became the target of Betty’s torments. To see that kind of friendship develop in the most trying of times was emotionally gripping and allowed us to see that beyond appearances and judgement, each person has a story to tell. A worthy one, too. Annabelle teaches us the power of kindness, resilient and firm believe in the kindness of strangers and the good human condition that makes us the people we are today.

I love how well written this book was emotionally and plot-wise. The characters were so well presented that they were created simply for the young readers to easily identify bullies and how they create conflict in a society. How sometimes, bullies and tormentors look innocent and can spew lies against those who are odd or a bit strange.

This book is meant for middle graders but I believe it appeals for adults as well. Because sometimes, we need books with simplicity such as Wolf Hollow to remind us that prejudice has existed for the longest of time. And only kindness and bravery can endure it.

“And I decided that there might be things I would never understand, no matter how hard I tried. Though try I would. And that there would be people who would never hear my one small voice, no matter what I had to say. But then a better thought occurred, and this was the one I carried away with me that day: If my life was to be just a single note in an endless symphony, how could I not sound it out for as long and as loudly as I could?”

I would recommend Wolf Hollow for all lovers of To Kill a Mockingbird (Harper Lee) and Pax (Sara Pennypacker)! They have similar vibes to Wolf Hollow and this book will leave you in emotional heartbreak at what awaits you at the end of the book.

RATING: ★★★★★

Have you read this? What did you think about it? 🙂

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