Another Journey Back Home: a Review of The Next Person You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom

Screen Shot 2018-11-10 at 11.16.07 AM

Genre: General Fiction
Publisher: Harper
Publication date: October 9th, 2018
Format: Paperback
Source: Pansing Books
Page Count: 224

Add to Goodreads
Buy from MPH Online, Kinokuniya Malaysia

Blurb:

In this enchanting sequel to the number one bestseller The Five People You Meet in Heaven, Mitch Albom tells the story of Eddie’s heavenly reunion with Annie—the little girl he saved on earth—in an unforgettable novel of how our lives and losses intersect.

Fifteen years ago, in Mitch Albom’s beloved novel, The Five People You Meet in Heaven, the world fell in love with Eddie, a grizzled war veteran- turned-amusement park mechanic who died saving the life of a young girl named Annie. Eddie’s journey to heaven taught him that every life matters. Now, in this magical sequel, Mitch Albom reveals Annie’s story.

The accident that killed Eddie left an indelible mark on Annie. It took her left hand, which needed to be surgically reattached. Injured, scarred, and unable to remember why, Annie’s life is forever changed by a guilt-ravaged mother who whisks her away from the world she knew. Bullied by her peers and haunted by something she cannot recall, Annie struggles to find acceptance as she grows. When, as a young woman, she reconnects with Paulo, her childhood love, she believes she has finally  found happiness.

As the novel opens, Annie is marrying Paulo. But when her wedding night day ends in an unimaginable accident, Annie finds herself on her own heavenly journey—and an inevitable reunion with Eddie, one of the five people who will show her how her life mattered in ways she could not have fathomed.

Poignant and beautiful, filled with unexpected twists, The Next Person You Meet in Heaven reminds us that not only does every life matter, but that every ending is also a beginning—we only need to open our eyes to see it.

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.14.29 PM

I was pretty excited to find out MITCH ALBOM wrote a sequel to his famous book The Five People You Meet in Heaven. I have always loved Albom’s works and I’m glad The Next Person You Meet in Heaven did not disappoint! I am always skeptical of sequels, but I am glad this one turned out great.

I first read The Five People You Meet in Heaven years ago back in college, and didn’t remember much from it when I started The Next Person You Meet in Heaven. But fret not, Albom does a fantastic job of bringing up bits and pieces from the first book to jog our memory. I found myself remembering Eddie in no time!

I love how the book brings us back and forth between Annie’s upbringing and her wedding night where an incident caused her to visit heaven, and Eddie eventually. In true Albom style, The Next Person You Meet in Heaven is an emotional book that questions just how huge of an effect we bring to other people through our own lives. I love how Albom’s style of writing triggers questions not only in interpersonal faith, but our own versions of heaven and what we seek in the afterlife. Just when we think our presence does not in any way brought value to other people, The Next Person You Meet in Heaven reminds us that we are always linked to others in the experiences we gain and give.

“Because we embrace our scars more than our healing”

Similar to the first book, The Next Person You Meet in Heaven brings us on another heavenly journey to see the five people who made a huge impact in Annie’s life. Reading about her life and how not everyone gets the life they deserve growing up, brought a sense of awareness that you can still bring a lot of joy when you overcome your adversity. I love this book for all the positivity it brought at the end. Everyone knows what a sucker I am for all things kind and optimistic. The Next Person You Meet in Heaven reminds us to always do good, no matter how small. You never know whose life you’ll touch through your presence. It is definitely a feel-good book that inspires you to be a little bit better.

Things happen to people all the time, how you choose to respond and grow from it is what makes you better. The Next Person You Meet in Heaven is definitely worth picking up. I am glad I had an extra couple days of vacation to indulge in this book. It’s a book you don’t want to miss, especially if you’re an Albom fan!

“Love comes when you least expect it. Love comes when you most need it. Love comes when you are ready to receive it or can no longer deny it.”

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.30.29 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 6.17.51 PM

Thank you Pansing Books for providing a copy in exchange of an honest review.

Advertisements

A Blindingly Painful Quest for Love: A Review of The Light Between Us by Katie Khan

 Screen Shot 2018-11-10 at 8.57.20 AM.png

Genre: Science Fiction
Publisher: DoubleDay
Publication date: August 9th, 2018
Format: Paperback
Source: Times Reads
Page Count: 320

Add to Goodreads
Buy from MPH Online, Kinokuniya Malaysia

Blurb:

Isaac and Thea were once close, but they’ve grown apart.

Thea works tirelessly, convinced she can prove everyone around her wrong – convinced she can prove that time travel is possible. But when one of her attempts goes wrong, she finds herself picking up the phone and calling her old friend.

Isaac is in New York – it’s the middle of the night, but when he sees who’s calling him, he cannot ignore his phone. At Thea’s request, he travels home, determined to help her in her hour of need.

But neither of them are prepared for what they will discover when he gets there.

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.14.29 PM

I am beginning to think love stories set in a scifi setting, is just not for me. It is utterly difficult for me to appreciate both the science and the love story unfolding in a book. I was sorely disappointed with KATIE KHAN’s The Light Between Us and her attempt at romanticising a platonic friendship within space and time continuum theories. And here’s the thing: I’m an engineering nerd AND a hopeless romantic, but The Light Between Us did not meet whatever meager expectations I had of it.

In all honesty, the science was brilliant. While I have no core physics background, I loved reading the experimental procedures and physic theories. That was the only upside to The Light Between Us. The theories seemed sound enough not to turn out to be too fictional, and realistic enough that it could happen in a fictional world. But everything else seemed like a mess for me.

The story picks up when Rosy, Thea’s friend disappears after one of Thea’s time travel experiments go wrong. Suddenly, Isaac, Thea’s best friend of 7 years, is in the picture and conveniently find himself around London trying to search for clues as to where Rosy went. I felt Rosy’s role in The Light Between Us wasn’t as significant as I hoped it would be. There isn’t much plot to actually finding Rosy, but the story centers around the friendship between Thea and Isaac and how they eventually address their feelings.

“She’s comforted that somewhere, across time zones, somebody understands”

Thea and Isaac’s friendship started out as something very interesting to read. I was keen on knowing if their platonic friendship could ever developed into something more. But as the story progresses, I became less invested in them. Simply because I got bored by the plot and writing. I admit that while the ending made me a little bit sad, I can’t help but think it wasn’t really suitable for the book. I ended up disliking Thea and thought the story plot wasn’t as conclusive as I hoped it would be.

I guess that is what happens when authors try to infuse a seemingly-solid love story into a scifi story filled with a lot of facts. It becomes very hard to balance the two and come out strong. Some say Khan’s writing is beautiful, but it was nothing spectacular for me. I was a bit frustrated as I was fooled by the blurb. I went into The Light Between Us thinking we’ll get some epic love story that took years to build (I’m a sucker for slow romance), but alas I was disappointed by the overall performance of this book and how that ending played out.

Not a favourite of mine, but I’m glad I gave it a go. I think YA authors do love-scifi a whole lot better than other genre authors. Still worth a try if you want to give this book a go! I hope you enjoy it more than I did.

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.30.29 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 6.18.06 PM

Thank you Times Reads for providing a copy in exchange of an honest review.

Of Falling in Love and Discovering Soul Mates: a Review of The Dark Between Stars by Atticus

Screen Shot 2018-11-06 at 5.14.48 PM
Genre:
Poetry
Publisher: Atria Books
Publication date: September 4th, 2018
Format: Paperback
Source: Personal
Page Count: 240

Add to Goodreads
Buy from Kinokuniya Malaysia, MPH Online

Blurb:

In his second collection of poetry, The Dark Between Stars, he turns his attention to the dualities of our lived experiences—the inescapable connections between our highest highs and lowest lows. He captures the infectious energy of starting a relationship, the tumultuous realities of commitment, and the agonizing nostalgia of being alone again. While grappling with the question of how to live with purpose and find meaning in the journey, these poems offer both honest explorations of loneliness and our search for connection, as well as light-hearted, humorous observations. As Atticus writes poignantly about dancing, Paris, jazz clubs, sunsets, sharing a bottle of wine on the river, rainy days, creating, and destroying, he illustrates that we need moments of both beauty and pain—the darkness and the stars—to fully appreciate all that life and love have to offer.

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.14.29 PM

It feels like it’s been ages since I last finished a book, let alone review one. I apologize for letting life get in the way and not being more active as I’d have liked here.

I was at a point in my life where I needed some good poetry, decent if I dare ask for it, to wake up my senses and appreciate all the love humans have in our own capacity. And I must say The Dark Between Stars pretty much did the job. So it’s not the best poetry book ever written, but it does make your heart warm and fuzzy with all the feels.

“Silly girl,”
the old lady laughed
“your
different
is
your
beautiful.”

The Dark Between Stars is Attitcus’s second poetry book. It is filled with short poems simply about the beauty of falling in love. Coupled with many beautiful photos, you gain a sense of whimsical atmosphere as you read this book describing the emotions experienced as your heart gives way to love.

It is filled with 3 chapters: Stars, Between, and The Dark. Yes, they are arranged in a reverse order from the name of this book. However, there wasn’t much difference between all 3 chapters. All of them talked about falling in love and the beauty of having someone to hold and cherish. A small portion of the book talked about heartbreak and self love, and I wished we had more of these to read. But it wasn’t meant to be…

In all honesty, I found his words to be a bit on the cheesy side. A bit cliche in some cases. But while I’m not the biggest fan of overly-romantic poems, his words do bring some sort of comfort. I am glad to know that humans everywhere are capable of falling in love, and believing that love is worth fighting for.

An overall enjoyable book. I will give his first book a try if it ever comes on sale. The Dark Between Stars was a wonderful respite for this cold heart of mine. I am happy to know so many forms of love exists in this world.

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.30.29 PM

 Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 6.17.59 PM

A Tale of First Loves and Fates: a Review of The Light We Lost by Jill Santopolo

Screen Shot 2018-09-23 at 3.55.05 PM

Genre: General Fiction
Publisher: G.P. Putnam’s Sons
Publication date: May 9th, 2017
Format: Paperback
Source: Times Reads
Page Count: 328

Add to Goodreads
Buy from MPH Online or  Kinokuniya Malaysia

Blurb:

He was the first person to inspire her, to move her, to truly understand her. Was he meant to be the last?

Lucy is faced with a life-altering choice. But before she can make her decision, she must start her story—their story—at the very beginning.

Lucy and Gabe meet as seniors at Columbia University on a day that changes both of their lives forever. Together, they decide they want their lives to mean something, to matter. When they meet again a year later, it seems fated—perhaps they’ll find life’s meaning in each other. But then Gabe becomes a photojournalist assigned to the Middle East and Lucy pursues a career in New York. What follows is a thirteen-year journey of dreams, desires, jealousies, betrayals, and, ultimately, of love. Was it fate that brought them together? Is it choice that has kept them away? Their journey takes Lucy and Gabe continents apart, but never out of each other’s hearts.

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Warning: Minor spoilers ahead!

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.14.29 PM

The Light We Lost by JILL SANTOPOLO is the story of unforgettable first loves and how moving on is one of the bravest things to do. The Light We Lost reminds us of that strong connection we may feel with our first love, that eventually leads us to make decisions that change our lives forever. First loves are ethreal, and they are sometimes what keeps us from what we’re meant to have in life.

Which is what makes The Light We Lost such an interesting read. It explores the situations where first loves are these idealistic connections you feel with a person, and it questions the role of fate and free will in that equation. How much of our lives are governed by our choices to stay or leave the ones we love? How much of our decisions are driven by passion for our careers or the ones we’re with?

“Love does that. It makes you feel infinite and invincible, like the whole world is open to you, anything is achievable, and each day will be filled with wonder. Maybe it’s the act of opening yourself up, letting someone else in— or maybe it’s the act of caring so deeply about another person that it expands your heart.”

I loved reading The Light We Lost for these very questions that were triggered in my mind. I find love makes people do the craziest of things, and I’m beginning to think that might not be the most romantic, or best, thing in the world. Our main protagonist, Lucy, finds herself returning emotionally to her first love even as she’s in a more stable relationship. First loves are always made out to be idealistic but they are rarely sustainable for the majority that I’ve seen. Especially when they’ve proven to be a wildfire, instead of a heart fire.

Lucy’s decisions in The Light We Lost makes me question the type of person she really is and what exact message the author is trying to portray. But, I think in the end, we understand a little bit more of the human condition to gravitate towards a love that was so full of passion, strength and undivided attention. It might not be the right thing to consciously decide to do, but when it comes to love, nothing is truly guaranteed.

The Light We Lost was a beautiful read for me. With short chapters it makes for a very quick read. It’s easy to get swept up in Lucy’s story that spans over 13 years. But as you read this book, I urge you to think of your own love story and how it’s made you the person you are today. I’m grateful I’ve never had a first love like Gabe. Because it seems to cause nothing but misery to Lucy, despite her very strong feelings for him. I don’t think I would ever want to be in a newer relationship and still be thinking about my ex-lover. I think some things are meant to stay in the past, and never be dug up ever again.

Overall, The Light We Lost is a compelling read about heartbreak, first love and the act of moving on as best we can. I’m not a big fan of the ending because it seemed a little irresponsible on the protagonist’s part. But this is still a book worth reading and thinking about what type of love you want in life.

“Some relationships feel like a wildfire-they’re powerful and compelling and majestic and dangerous and have the capability to burn you before you even realize you’ve been consumed…..some relationships feel like a hearth fire-they’re solid and stable and cozy and nourishing..”

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.30.29 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 6.17.51 PM

Thank you Times Reads for providing a copy in exchange of an honest review.

A Question on Immortality’s Worth: a Review of Suicide Club by Rachel Heng

Screen Shot 2018-08-26 at 9.20.51 PM

Genre: Science Fiction
Publisher: Sceptre
Publication date: July 10th, 2018
Format: Paperback
Source: Pansing Books
Page Count: 372

Add to Goodreads
Buy from MPH Online, Kinokuniya Malaysia

Blurb:

In this debut set in near future NYC—where lives last 300 years and the pursuit of immortality is all-consuming—Lea must choose between her estranged father and her chance to live forever.

Lea Kirino is a “Lifer,” which means that a roll of the genetic dice has given her the potential to live forever—if she does everything right. And Lea is an overachiever. She’s a successful trader on the New York exchange—where instead of stocks, human organs are now bought and sold—she has a beautiful apartment, and a fiancé who rivals her in genetic perfection. And with the right balance of HealthTech™, rigorous juicing, and low-impact exercise, she might never die.

But Lea’s perfect life is turned upside down when she spots her estranged father on a crowded sidewalk. His return marks the beginning of her downfall as she is drawn into his mysterious world of the Suicide Club, a network of powerful individuals and rebels who reject society’s pursuit of immortality, and instead chose to live—and die—on their own terms. In this future world, death is not only taboo; it’s also highly illegal. Soon Lea is forced to choose between a sanitized immortal existence and a short, bittersweet time with a man she has never really known, but who is the only family she has left in the world.

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.14.29 PM

Suicide Club by RACHEL HENG is about the possibility of medical technology advances reaching new heights in the next century or two that enables humans to have longer lifespans and thus, provide more contributions to the world.

I was intrigued to read this book based on its concept of near-immortality and the fact that for centuries humans have been trying to find the elixir of life. To see how science achieves it made Suicide Club have such an appealing concept. Too bad the concept wasn’t executed at its best.

I feel like I’m missing out on some big message by the time I was done with Suicide Club. Imagine the brilliant premise this book holds: immortality, or least longer life span (think of the age of hundreds) is within reach to those deserving and are called the lifers. Those who stict on a strict diet regimen, work out every single day, avoid stress and muscle exertion, monthly enhancements to ensure your skin and health are pristine. And those unworthy of these extended lifespans are cast aside as failures, called sub-zeros, destined to work as laborers and simple jobs; never given any chance to excel at anything because of the ‘number’ they’re assigned to at birth.

I would have loved to see more dynamic between these two extremes, the lifers and the non-lifers. But unfortunately we only got some minimal interaction between the main character, a 100-year-old lifer called Lea and another lifer a part of the Suicide Club, Anja. Lea felt so off throughout the entire book that I truly did not understand her main purpose in Suicide Club. I preferred Anja’s point of view in the book where her circumstances felt real enough to empathize with. The rest of the characters in Suicide Club were pretty bland. Lea’s family members could have used more exploration, although I really enjoyed Lea’s interaction with her father. We hardly got satisfactory glimpses into the other characters, namely Anja and the rest of the non-lifers in Suicide Club. I believe having them more involved in the story would have made futuristic New York with its immaculate group of lifers that much more imaginable.

The trickiest thing about speculative fiction that sort of emulates science fiction, is the ability to have tiny details within the book that eventually adds up to the story. And a lot of details were lacking in Suicide Club. For instance, I never really understood Lea’s job in the beginning. You would think that having longer-living lifers would benefit societies more on education, health and science aspects. But instead Suicide Club‘s elite lifers all feels a part of one big socialite group, which made me immediately lose interest in the entire community. Lea happens to be some big shot in a financial company based in New York. And her lifers group of friends compete to get the latest medical advances that would truly make them immortal. We don’t get to fully see at all the benefits that long lives has brought mankind, as I would expect science would take precedence in this matters. A missed opportunity in my opinion.

Then again, maybe that was a point the author wanted to drive within the book. Does immortality harbor selfish needs and eradicate the fear of death. And if so, are the wealthiest the first ones to have it?

Overall, Suicide Club had an interesting premise that definitely requires more exploration and discussion for the book to be fully appreciated. I still enjoyed how the plot triggered some questions on the worth of prolonging life if it means living in a bland lifestyle and forgoing passions and interests that are considered life-shortening. Give this a go nonetheless, it might suit your liking!

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.30.29 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 6.17.59 PM

Thank you Pansing Books for providing a copy in exchange of an honest review.

#YouWillBeFound: a Review of Dear Evan Hansen the Novel by Val Emmich, Steven Levenson, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul

Screen Shot 2018-08-26 at 5.17.09 PM.png

Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary
Publisher: Poppy
Publication date: October 9th, 2018
Format: ARC Paperback
Source: Times Reads
Page Count: 368

Read my review of Dear Evan Hansen screenplay here.

Add to Goodreads
Pre-Order from Kinokuniya Malaysia

Blurb:

Dear Evan Hansen,

Today’s going to be an amazing day and here’s why…

When a letter that was never meant to be seen by anyone draws high school senior Evan Hansen into a family’s grief over the loss of their son, he is given the chance of a lifetime: to belong. He just has to stick to a lie he never meant to tell, that the notoriously troubled Connor Murphy was his secret best friend.

Suddenly, Evan isn’t invisible anymore–even to the girl of his dreams. And Connor Murphy’s parents, with their beautiful home on the other side of town, have taken him in like he was their own, desperate to know more about their enigmatic son from his closest friend. As Evan gets pulled deeper into their swirl of anger, regret, and confusion, he knows that what he’s doing can’t be right, but if he’s helping people, how wrong can it be?

No longer tangled in his once-incapacitating anxiety, this new Evan has a purpose. And a website. He’s confident. He’s a viral phenomenon. Every day is amazing. Until everything is in danger of unraveling and he comes face to face with his greatest obstacle: himself.

A simple lie leads to complicated truths in this big-hearted coming-of-age story of grief, authenticity and the struggle to belong in an age of instant connectivity and profound isolation.

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.14.29 PM

Dear readers,

Today’s going to be an amazing day and here’s why….

Dear Evan Hansen, the Ton Award winning Best Musical of 2017, finally gets turned into a YA novel! And as one of the very, very few Malaysian fans of this musical, I can honestly say this is one YA novel you do not want to miss.

Dear Evan Hansen is the story of how one letter became the source of Evan’s problems. As he navigates his new life spun from a lie gone out of control, Evan starts realising his real place in this world and how everyone is battling through something and could use a little bit of help to get through.

And I suddenly feel the branch give way
I’m on the ground
My arm goes numb
I look around
And I see him come to get me

After listening to the Broadway cast musical a million times, I read the screenplay and absolutely loved Dear Evan Hansen even more. But the novel is truly something different. Dear Evan Hansen the novel allows us to take a more in depth look into the lives of the two main characters Evan and Connor. Two lonely boys who struggle with depression and anxiety. Two boys who could have even become friends in real life if it wasn’t for the current circumstances of life.

Issues or plots that were never touched on or mentioned in the musical are done so in the book. And that remains one of the most beautiful things about the Dear Evan Hansen novel. We get a closer look to how complicated both lives are and how fateful it was these two lives intertwined at the most opportune of moments.

Whilst it is categorized as a YA novel, Dear Evan Hansen has a mature voice to it that would be appreciated by anyone reading it regardless of age. Dear Evan Hansen is a coming-of-age story where it centers around mental health and the importance of inclusion. This book brings forth so many critical issues in our society and Dear Evan Hansen uses social media as a tool in an effortless way.

Another aspect of the book that I love is how the original lyrics to most of the Broadway tracks are incorporated into the dialogues. This in turn makes the novel an extension of the musical and not a separate entity with the same cast of characters. Epic tracks like For Forever, Sincerely Me, If I Could Tell Her, and You Will Be Found are all found in bits and pieces of the book, making it even more special. Fans of Dear Evan Hansen will feel right at home with all the original aspects of the musical added with more scenes and characters to make it more wholesome. New readers of Dear Evan Hansen will get a sense of what the musical is like.

Even when the dark comes crashing through
When you need a friend to carry you
And when you’re broken on the ground
You will be found

I read Dear Evan Hansen from the perspectives of a Broadway fan, but you can also read this book even with zero knowledge of its legendary Broadway background. You might find some parts of the plot confusing or struggle to find where each character plays a part in the bigger scheme of things. But despite that, I urge you to finish this book for the sole reason of what the ending will teach us. And after you’re done with this book, I urge you to listen to the Broad cast album.

You won’t regret it, I promise.

Dear Evan Hansen the novel brings into light more details of mental health, human loneliness and our need to be a part of something bigger than ourselves. This book reminds us that sometimes mental health gets the better of us, but other times we live another day to become a little bit better.

This is one of the best books I’ve read this year, and I will endlessly recommend this book and the musical to everyone. And on that note, I hope your day today is amazing. And on the days when you want to let go, I hope you hold on a bit longer and climb back down to the ground safely.

#YouWillBeFound

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.30.29 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 6.17.43 PM

Thank you Times Reads for providing a copy in exchange of an honest review.

And The Feathers Fall Onto Us: a Review of The Weight of a Thousand Feathers by Brian Conaghan

weight.PNG

Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary
Publisher: Bloomsbury
Publication date: June 14th, 2018
Format: ARC Paperback
Source: Pansing Books
Page Count: 320

Add to Goodreads
Buy from MPH Online, Kinokuniya Malaysia

Blurb:

Child experts will tell you that I’m way too young to carry such a burden of responsibility on my tender shoulders. But really, what do they know?’ Who is Bobby Seed? He’s just your average sixteen-year-old – same wants, same fears, same hang-ups. Dull, dull, dull. But then there’s the Bobby Seed who’s a world away from average. The Bobby Seed who has to wipe his mum’s backside, sponge her clean three times a week, try to soothe her pain. The Bobby Seed whose job it is to provide for his younger brother, Danny, to rub his back when he’s stressed and can only groan and rock instead of speak. That’s Bobby Seed. Same, same, same, yet different, different, different …

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.14.29 PM

The Weight of a Thousand Feathers is so beautifully written. I’m surprised I don’t see much hype over this underrated book. This book centers around young carers and what it really means to care for your loved ones.

“I feel the weight of its thousand feathers pressing, pressing, pressing me down.”

This is my first book by BRIAN CONAGHAN and I enjoy his writing very much in The Weight of a Thousand Feathers. We are introduced to Bobby Seed, a 16 year old caring for his bed-ridden mom who suffers from MS. From the very first page, readers are made conscious of Bobby’s responsibilities as his mother’s sole carer as he juggles school work and also cares for his 14 year old brother, Danny who, although not stated to have any specific learning disabilities, faces social challenges and requires more attention than a regular 14 year old. Having it easy is not what Bobby has.

If I could describe this book with one word, that word would inevitably be EMOTIONAL. There aren’t many YA books out there with a point of view from a teenage carer. The Weight of a Thousand Feathers takes an in depth look into Bobby’s day-to-day life and the things he does for his mom. I love how Bobby did everything with a reservation for love and not out of burden. His relationship with his mom was full of wit, warmth and undying love. It made reading The Weight of a Thousand Feathers that much harder when you know what’s coming in the end.

Empathizing with Bobby and Danny is what you’ll do for the entirety of this book. The Weight of a Thousand Feathers questions just how much would you be willing to do for your loved ones who are in pain. Does love justify any actions that are considered immoral as a norm? Ethically grey areas are touched in so many chapters of The Weight of a Thousand Feathers, which makes it such a brilliant read.

There isn’t much of a plot in The Weight of a Thousand Feathers as the duration of the book spans over an approximate school year focusing on Bobby’s care towards his mom. But The Weight of a Thousand Feathers works as a slow book since it focuses a lot on emotions and the personal insights into caring for someone. You’re immediately taken aback by how much happens when someone young cares for a parent.

I love Bobby Seed and everything he did for his family in this book. I love how selfless he was despite facing so many turmoils that no young carer should ever face. I love how at the end of everything, love prevails as it should.

I love The Weight of a Thousand Feathers, and I think you will too.

“There’ve been loads of days when she’s too shattered to laugh, too sore to speak. But I know I’ll miss these moments. Give me misery over nothing any day.”

For fans of Me Before You, The Weight of a Thousand Feathers will provoke more discussions of ethically grey areas where love is questioned in pursuit of ending one’s suffering. Filled with raw emotions and tear-jerking scenes, this book will occupy your heart for a long time after you’re done reading it.

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 3.46.50 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 2.30.29 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 6.17.43 PM

Thank you Pansing Books for providing a copy in exchange of an honest review.